Fine Art Photography Collector's Resource

A Resource for Collectors of Fine Art Photography, The Landscape Photography Of Philip Hyde And His Colleagues

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Philip Hyde’s Mountain Landscapes Extended

November 16th, 2010 · Exhibitions and Other Events

Rare Philip Hyde Original Black and White Vintage Prints, Original Dye Transfer Prints, Original Cibachrome Prints and Archival Fine Art Digital Prints:

Philip Hyde’s Mountain Landscapes

Camera Obscura Gallery
1309 Bannock Street, Denver, CO   80204
303-623-4059

Across from the Denver Art Museum

NOW EXTENDED!

October 1–November 13, 2010.  EXTENDED TO November 20.

 

“The Divine Jewelry of Winter” -John Muir, Ice Plates On Indian Creek II, Northern Sierra Nevada, California, 1976 by Philip Hyde. This original Cibachrome print is part of the Camera Obscura exhibition.

Philip Hyde, American Landscape Photographer and Conservationist, b. 1921 d. 2006

Philip Hyde’s black and white prints were first exhibited at the San Francisco Museum of Art in 1950 in a two-man show with his California School of Fine Arts classmate Bob Hollingsworth. Later his photographs were exhibited with Minor White, and with the members of Group f64 who were his photography school instructors such as Edward Weston, Ansel Adams, Dorothea Lange, Imogen Cunningham and other definers of the medium. Minor White, also curated several exhibitions of his work for major museums in the Eastern U. S. including George Eastman House and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Philip Hyde’s color prints have also been widely exhibited and collected by major national museums. His photographs are part of over 50 permanent collections.

For a complete description of the show and more information about Philip Hyde’s Mountain Landscapes at Camera Obscura Gallery see the blog post, “Vintage And Digital Prints Together In One Show.”

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Vintage Black And White Prints Now At Select Photography Galleries

October 28th, 2010 · Special Announcements

A Selection of Vintage Photography School Era Philip Hyde Original Black and White Prints Now Available At Select Galleries

Ponderosa Pines, Winter, Lake Almanor Near Westwood, Sierra Nevada-Cascade Mountains Transition, California, 1950 by Philip Hyde. Exhibited with members of Group f64.

A group of 4X5 and 5X7 black and white vintage contact prints and 8X10 vintage prints of Yosemite National Park and Point Lobos State Reserve archivally hinge matted on Rising mat board with hand-made paper corners are now at the Weston Gallery. A selection of vintage prints, 4X5, 5X7, 8X10, 11X14 and 16X20 are now at several other select galleries including Lumiere Gallery, Peter Fetterman Gallery, Scott Nichols Gallery and Smith Andersen North. These are Philip Hyde original black and white vintage prints from “Photography’s Golden Era,” 1942-1952, before and during Philip Hyde’s attendance at photography school.

To learn more about the vintage prints produced during the first 10 years of Ansel Adams’ photography department at the California School of Fine Arts, now the San Francisco Art Institute, when Minor White was lead instructor and Group f64 members Imogen Cunningham, Dorothea Lange and Edward Weston were guest lecturers see the blog post, “The Golden Decade: Photography at the California School of Fine Arts, 1945-55.”

Philip Hyde original black and white vintage prints NOW AVAILABLE AT:
LUMIERE GALLERY in Atlanta, Georgia
PETER FETTERMAN GALLERY in Santa Monica, California
SCOTT NICHOLS GALLERY in San Francisco, California
SMITH ANDERSEN NORTH GALLERY in San Anselmo, California
THE WESTON GALLERY in Carmel, California
PHILIP HYDE PHOTOGRAPHY online

or call David Leland Hyde 303-562-8198
or write prints[at]philiphyde[dot]com

What Does Vintage Mean? Black and White Vintage Print Pricing.

The black and white prints we refer to here as “vintage prints” are vintage in two ways, as we understand the term’s application to black and white photography. These black and white prints are both made within a year or two of the negative AND more than 40 years old. This double criteria of course applies to any black and white prints Philip Hyde printed before 1970.

Galleries, dealers, collectors and museum curators use the term “vintage prints” in two ways. It can refer to any print regardless of age that was printed within a year or two of the making of the photograph. A wider meaning of “vintage prints” is simply any prints that are over 40 years old. Philip Hyde only made prints within a year or two of the negative, except for a small number of exceptions in the late 1990s. He had planned to make many more newer black and white prints of his older black and white photographs, but he began to lose his eyesight which made darkroom printing impossible. Regardless, nearly all Philip Hyde original black and white prints fit the first definition of “vintage prints” and any prints Philip Hyde made before 1970 also fit the second definition.

The black and white vintage prints Philip Hyde made during photography school at the California School of Fine Arts under Ansel Adams, Minor White, and Edward Weston are increasingly sought after by collectors and are in limited supply. Philip Hyde original vintage prints are RARE. He never printed more than eight prints of a given image and in most cases he printed only two to four. For several print exchanges between the photography school classmates, Philip Hyde printed as many as 19 prints of each photograph for the students and a few extras for faculty who attended the print exchange gatherings. Besides the exchange prints, today there are usually only one or two left of each photograph. Those now available were all made from 1942 to 1952.

Variations in value are due to several factors, but are primarily based on the photograph’s subsequent significance, exhibition history, publishing history, etc. There is generally little variation in condition, with a few exceptions. The Weston Gallery, Scott Nichols Gallery, Camera Obscura and Smith Anderson North are now selling 4X5 and 5X7 contact prints hinge mounted with hand-made paper corners on Rising Board for $900 to $1600 depending on the image. Vintage black and white 8X10s are also now officially available in the above locations in a range between $1800 and $2500 depending on the photograph and print date.

Ansel Adams signed all prints made by him. Do prints have to be signed to be authentic?

Philip Hyde and many other photographers of the time did not sign many of their small prints. Edward Steichen for example, when printing made at least two prints of each image. One would go to the press unsigned and one would go to the galleries signed. The 8X10 Philip Hyde prints that remain are often Press Prints and some are unsigned. Signed prints by Philip Hyde were made specifically for major museums and gallery exhibitions, are even more rare and are priced $500-$1,000 higher.

The contact prints are identified with Philip Hyde’s stamp and printing notes and some are signed, while the 8X10s are sometimes signed as exhibition prints and sometimes not signed but identified with Philip Hyde’s press prints stamp. In the mid 20th Century it was common practice for many photographers to stamp rather than sign small contact prints and 8X10 black and white press prints. The 4X5 and 5X7 contact prints are particularly of interest because they were made in the same contact printing style of Edward Weston, who also printed many 4X5 and 5X7 black and white contact prints around the same time period and earlier.

COMING SOON to Landscape Photography Blogger will be a description of Philip Hyde’s black and white silver gelatin printing process for black and white prints, with variations as originally taught by Ansel Adams, Edward Weston and Minor White at the California School of Fine Arts, now the San Francisco Art Institute.

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Philip Hyde’s Mountain Landscapes

September 25th, 2010 · Exhibitions and Other Events

Rare Philip Hyde Original Black and White Vintage Prints From The 1940s and 1950s Join Original Dye Transfer Prints, Original Cibachrome Prints and Archival Digital Prints in a New Exhibition:

Philip Hyde’s Mountain Landscapes at Camera Obscura Gallery

Across from the Denver Art Museum

Displayed with Affirmations of Spirit: Photographs by Carolyn Guild

Camera Obscura Gallery
1309 Bannock Street, Denver, CO   80204
303-623-4059

October 1–November 13, 2010.  EXTENDED TO November 20.

Opening reception October 1, 5-9 pm and gallery talk 7 pm with David Leland Hyde

"The Divine Jewelry of Winter" -John Muir, Ice Plates On Indian Creek II, Northern Sierra Nevada, California, 1976 by Philip Hyde. This will be one of several original Cibachrome prints made by Philip Hyde in the Camera Obscura Exhibition.

Philip Hyde, American Landscape Photographer and Environmentalist, b. 1921 d. 2006

In 1951 the Sierra Club and Wilderness Society sent Philip Hyde on the world’s first conservation photography assignment. As a result of his trip to Dinosaur National Monument in Northwestern Colorado and Utah, Philip Hyde became photographer for the first book published for a conservation cause: “This Is Dinosaur: Echo Park Country” edited by Wallace Stegner. Born in San Francisco in 1921, landscape photographer Philip Hyde dedicated his life and 60 years of full-time photography to conservation.

Hyde first exhibited his original black and white prints in national venues in the early 1950s with his Group f64 mentors from the California School of Fine Arts now the San Francisco Art Institute: Ansel Adams, Edward Weston and Imogen Cunningham. Lead Instructor, Minor White, also curated several exhibitions of his work for major museums in the Eastern U. S. including George Eastman House and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Hyde’s color prints have also been widely exhibited and collected by major national museums. His photographs are part of over 50 permanent collections.

Hal Gould, gallerist at Camera Obscura Gallery for over 50 years, founded the Colorado Photographic Art Center in 1963, one of the world’s first galleries devoted solely to photography. Hal Gould was also a member for years and one of the founders of AIPAD, the Association of International Photography Art Dealers, “dedicated to creating and maintaining high standards in the business of exhibiting, buying and selling photographs as art.”

For more information about the Philip Hyde Camera Obscura Exhibition see the blog post, “Vintage And Digital Prints Together In One Show.”

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Over 500 People Attend Golden Decade Exhibition

September 22nd, 2010 · Exhibitions and Other Events

Over 500 People Attend Golden Decade Exhibition: Vintage Prints of Ansel Adams’ Students Sell Well

Over 500 People attended the Smith Anderson North Gallery pre-publication release exhibition for the new book: The Golden Decade: California School of Fine Arts Photography 1945-1955 about the first ten years of Ansel Adams’ photography program.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Golden Decade Exhibition, Smith Anderson North Gallery, San Anselmo, California, 2010 by David Leland Hyde.

San Anselmo, Calif.Sep 21, 2010 – The Golden Decade Exhibition, which is being scheduled to tour museums, includes the work of 32 photographers who studied with Ansel Adams during the first decade of his San Francisco photography program while Minor White was lead instructor after World War II and Edward Weston, Dorothea Lange, Imogen Cunningham and others guest lectured.

The Golden Decade Exhibition including works by such names as Pirkle Jones, Ruth Marion Baruch, Philip Hyde, William Heick, Pat Harris, Bob Hollingsworth, Cameron Macauley, Ira Latour, Benjamen Chinn, Rose Mandel, David Johnson, John Upton and others continues through October 15th at Smith Anderson North Gallery, 20 Greenfield Lane, San Anselmo, California. “There is currently a lot of energy around the work from this period,” said Scott Nichols, collector and owner of Scott Nichols Gallery in San Francisco. Smith Anderson North sold more than 30 vintage prints the first day of the show including one by Philip Hyde that was the first to sell.

A number of the Golden Decade photographers participated in photography’s historical events such as The Family of Man Exhibition (1955, New York and international venues) and The Perceptions Exhibition (1954, San Francisco), and many of these California School of Fine Arts photographers were prominently featured in the early issues of Aperture magazine. A number of Golden Decade photographers have had books published, notably Pirkle Jones with his wife, Ruth Marion Baruch, John Upton and Philip Hyde whose photographs were the first used for land conservation with the ground-breaking Sierra Club Exhibit Format Series.

For more information, see also the Landscape Photography Blogger blog post, “Over 500 People Attend Golden Decade Opening.”

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Scott Nichols Gallery Summer Show 2010

July 10th, 2010 · Exhibitions and Other Events

The Scott Nichols Gallery Presents

THE SUMMER SHOW 2010

Jeanne And The Longboard, circa 1963, by Ron Church.

The Scott Nichols Gallery is proud to present The Summer Show, a selection of photographs from the gallery’s collection. The exhibition features over 100 vintage and contemporary fine art prints by Berenice Abbott, Ansel Adams, Ruth Bernhard, Wynn Bullock, Harry Callahan, Paul Caponigro, Ron Church, Imogen Cunningham, Monica Denevan, William Garnett, Lucy Goodhart, Rolfe Horn, Philip Hyde, Mona Kuhn, Dorothea Lange, Barbara Morgan, Rondal Partridge, Michael Rauner, George Tice, Brett Weston, Edward Weston, Don Worth and others.

CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE EXHIBITION

July 1 – September 4, 2010

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Archival Digital Prints Allow New Releases At Special Prices

June 28th, 2010 · Exhibitions and Other Events

Four NEW Philip Hyde RELEASES of Archival Fine Art Digital Prints Will Now Be at Special Introductory Prices:

1.  “Men of Oaxaca, Oaxaca, Mexico, 1995”
Never before published or exhibited. World Premier at Mountain Light Gallery. (See the photograph full page, CLICK HERE.)

Base Of Havasu Falls, Havasupai Indian Reservation, Grand Canyon, Arizona, 1968 by Philip Hyde.

Also, for more information about the process of bringing these images into the digital age, scanning, processing and making archival fine art digital prints see the blog post, “New Philip Hyde Releases At Mountain Light Gallery Exhibition.” For more information on the exhibition see the blog post, “Photography Of Philip Hyde At Mountain Light Gallery.”
2.  “Pioneer Basin, Fourth Recess, John Muir Wilderness, Sierra Nevada Mountains, California”
Never before published or exhibited. World Premier at Mountain Light Gallery. (See the photograph full page, CLICK HERE.)
3.  “Base of Havasu Falls, Havasupai Indian Reservation, Grand Canyon, Arizona”
Widely published and exhibited but not for over 30 years. Contemporary Premier at Mountain Light Gallery. Added to website today. (See the photograph full page, CLICK HERE.)
4.  “Mt. Jefferson, Jefferson Wilderness Area, Oregon Cascades, Oregon”
Published over 50 years ago but never exhibited. World Premier at Mountain Light Gallery. Added to website today. (See the photograph full page, CLICK HERE.)

Mt. Jefferson, Jefferson Wilderness Area, Oregon Cascade Mountains, Oregon, 1959 by Philip Hyde. Sent by David Brower to photograph this wilderness area for potential campaign to establish a National Park. The idea of a National Park in the Oregon Cascades never gained significant support.

The special pricing will last until five (5) prints of any size sell of each image, or until the end of 2010, whichever comes first.

8X10    regular price $250 print only, unmatted and unframed, special price $175 for the first five prints or through December 31, 2010

11X14   normally $450, now $350 first five

16X20   normally $650, now $500 first five

20X24   normally $850, now $625

24X30   normally $1050, now $750

32X40   normally $1250, now $875

Regular Pricing

Philip Hyde Archival Fine Art Digital Prints Regular Pricing

Print Size      Unmatted/Unframed           Matted         Matted & Framed

8X10               $250                                     $285                        $325

11X14                450                                       510                           575

16X20               650                                       735                           825

20X24              850                                       975                         1100

24X30*           1050                                     1200                         1350

32X40*           1250                                    1425                         1600

*Some photographs not available in 24X30 or 32X40 sizes.

Each print is numbered as part of a special edition. Every time an image sells 10 prints, it goes up $50 in all sizes. For example: We have made 14 prints of “K-RR-52 Virginia Creeper” and sold seven. As soon as two more prints sell in any size, the prints will go up $50 in all sizes. Thus “Virginia Creeper” will be $300 for an unmatted and unframed 8X10 print, $500 for an 11X14, $700 for a 16X20 and so on.

Philip Hyde New Releases Archival Print Pricing

As of June 28, 2010

(This pricing applies only to the new releases.)

Print Size      Unmatted/Unframed           Matted         Matted & Framed

8X10               $175                                        $210                        $250

11X14                350                                          410                          475

16X20              500                                           585                          675

20X24              625                                           750                          875

24X30*            750                                          900                         1050

32X40*            875                                        1050                          1225

*Some photographs not available in 24X30 or 32X40 sizes.

This special pricing will last until five (5) prints are sold of the image offered, or until the end of 2010, whichever comes first. Once five prints sell or 2010 ends, the prints will revert to the regular pricing.

For Print Acquisitions Please Go To Contact Page Or Order Prints Inside New Releases Portfolio.

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The Experts On Starting A Photography Collection 1

May 17th, 2010 · Collecting How-To

Thunderstorm Over The Grand Canyon, alternately titled Thunderstorm Over Navajo Country from The Grand Canyon North Rim, Arizona, 1963 by Philip Hyde. Exhibited at the International Center of Photography, New York, "Master Photographs: Photography In The Fine Arts" Exhibition. Became a book called "Master Photographs: From 'Photography In The Fine Arts' Exhibitions, 1959-1967" with essays by Norman Cousins and others.

(See the photograph above full screen Click Here.)

Photography Has Proven One Of The Most Profitable And Satisfying Art Forms To Collect.

How Do The Experts Recommend Starting A Collection?

The maturing of photography as an art form has been accompanied by an explosion of interest both in the enjoyment and creation of photographs. With the advent of digital cameras and camera phones, nearly everyone is now making images. Interest in collecting photography has also grown dramatically, not to mention the value of some photographs.

In a November 2006 Fortune Magazine Article titled, “Investors Zoom In On Photography,” Stephen Milioti wrote that in the decade from 1996 to 2006, a photographic print by Helmut Newton “enjoyed better price appreciation than a comparable investment in an S&P 500 index fund, General Electric Stock, or ten-year treasury bonds. And Newton isn’t the only photographer whose prices are on the rise.” Prices and demand fell off in 2008 and 2009 but are rebounding well in 2010. See the blog post, “Photography And Art Dealers Rebound In 2010.” Photography collecting is generally much easier to get into than collecting any other art form. For example: collectible photographs are still much more reasonably priced than collectible paintings and within reach of most Americans. Caution is still advised though. Bizmove.com’s Small Business Knowledge Base, Guide to Good Fine Art Investment said, “Buying art solely as an investment is riskier, in many cases, than the stock market. Most art decreases in value. Over 95 percent of the first one-person shows in New York (or any major city) in any given season are from artists never heard from again.”

Lorraine Anne Davis, a columnist for Black and White Magazine, appraiser and respected consultant to museums and photography art dealers spent five years reviewing and updating the contents of a classic book on the subject called The Photograph Collector’s Guide by Lee D. Witkin and Barbara London. The Photograph Collector’s Guide first published in 1979 is still considered by many to be an essential reference book and will be republished in a new edition this Fall. Lee D. Witkin founded the Witkin Gallery in New York City in 1969 that worked to educate collectors and showed the historically important work of Alfred Stieglitz, Edward Steichen, Edward Weston, Edward S. Curtis, Manuel Alvarez Bravo, Brassai, Robert Doisneau and others.  Lee D. Witkin until his passing in 1984, also was an internationally known appraiser and advisor to major museums, private collectors and the LIFE photographic archive.

In The Photograph Collector’s Guide, Lee D. Witkin described how when he first opened Witkin Gallery experts in the art field that he asked for advice were all negative. He was told that “there was little hope of a gallery making it.” Lee D. Witkin wrote:

I was warned that six months, one year at most, was as long as I could expect to last—because no one collected photographs. The explosion of interest in photography during the 1970s is a truly remarkable phenomenon in light of the century and a quarter of neglect the medium and those practicing it suffered. In years past the idea of the photograph as a collectible art object was certainly suspect, if not inconceivable…. What I did have, however, along with the instincts of a professional, were the passions of a collector. Collecting (and every collector knows the symptoms) means seeking, desiring, wanting, yearning for, coveting, having to have…and–as soon as possible—acquiring, possessing, hugging to the bosom, and savoring with all the joys and pride of ownership. It is impossible to explain to someone who is not consumed by such passions why the purchase of a special painting, book or photograph takes priority over a trip to Europe, a new pair of shoes, or a gold inlay. We all know collecting art is not a pursuit basic for survival. However, it is an exquisite involvement with aesthetic achievements—a kind of mingling with the gods…. Photography is still relatively untapped. Many masterworks and gentler minor works have yet to be discovered and appreciated. A solid base for collecting and for future interest has been established not only by the serious activity of major museums and individuals, but also by educational programs. Many beginning collectors ask, “What should I collect?” My advice always has been and always will be: Collect what you like and trust your instincts. The good fortune of a young woman who years ago bought on instinct what is now a highly valued Imogen Cunningham print illustrates what I mean. She tells me whenever we meet, “I love my Cunningham—every day.”

Lee D. Witkin quoted one of his gallery’s first customers, Dan Berley, who became a prominent collector. He said:

I have always used two criteria in my collecting: first, the image must produce a strong emotional feeling in me; and, second, there must be a high quality to the photographic print itself. Because I never collect ‘names,’ per se, I buy the work of unknown or forgotten photographers as well as famous ones.

Lee D. Witkin emphasized the importance of “doing your homework,” to include learning about various photographic processes and their dates, understanding terminology, reading about the most up-to-date techniques for care and preservation, reading exhibition catalogs, and attending gallery and museum shows. “Examine photographs closely and discover that original prints have unique qualities of tone, luminosity, and “presence” that no book or magazine reproduction can duplicate. From the first day I opened the doors of my gallery, I have repeatedly heard the remark: ‘I’d only seen the image in books—I had no idea it was so beautiful!’”

The same goes today: browsing websites and looking at photographs on the internet is a good way to start and to narrow your searches, but there is no substitute for seeing a “live” exhibition and being able to meet the artist or a knowledgeable dealer. Bizmove.com’s Small Business Knowledge Base, Guide to Good Fine Art Investment also had these points to offer the new collector as guides:

  • Don’t buy a painting (or photograph) because it matches the sofa.
  • Don’t buy a work of art because your neighbors are collecting “names” like Picasso or Man Ray.
  • Don’t blindly follow the critics. Time is the only test of art. A critic’s tastes may veer in different directions at different periods. Just because experts endorse an artist now doesn’t mean they’ll favor him in 10 or 20 years.
  • Don’t be afraid to sail against the wind. Some of the biggest fortunes in art or antiques have been made by people who weren’t afraid to buck the trend. Tastes change.
  • Look for periods and artists that please your own eye, but are not popular at present. Reputations change with time.
  • Stick to reputable galleries that are members of dealer’s associations (such as AIPAD, The Association of International Photography Art Dealers.)
  • Learn to identify that elusive characteristic called quality.
  • Take courses on art (and photography).
  • Find the smartest people (artists, museum curators, top dealers and critics) in the field and pick their brains on a continuing basis.
  • Expect works of art and your collection to fare poorly for a few years then appreciate.

The number one reason collectors fail is lack of education. Many experts suggest reading, studying and frequenting galleries, museums and exhibitions for at least a year before buying anything. This is just the beginning of what there is to know. Many collectors spend many years and are still learning.

The blog post to come, “The Experts On Starting A Photography Collection 2” and others will examine pricing, rarity, types of editions, more collecting pointers, other methods for getting started and a list of resources and books for the collector.

See also the blog post, “Photography And Art Dealers Rebound In 2010.”

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Famous Photographers Meet: Philip Hyde At Mountain Light Gallery

April 22nd, 2010 · Exhibitions and Other Events

Galen Rowell and Philip Hyde met only a few times in life briefly, but if they could meet again now, what would they talk about? Would they disagree about equipment and photography styles? Would they change the subject to what they had in common to a greater degree such as their approach to photographing nature? Both men were friendly and liked to share their adventures. Would they entertain each others with tales of their travels? Would they strike up a friendship based on their shared feelings about wilderness, the preservation of wildlife and the lands of indigenous peoples?

Throughout his career, Philip Hyde tenaciously stuck with large format cameras while Galen Rowell’s bywords were, “fast and light.” Philip Hyde pioneered color landscape photography, whereas Galen Rowell invented the adventure photography genre. Both men saw photography as the means for a life in the backcountry and a tool for preserving the natural state of wild places. Today history is in the making again with the work of the two famous photographers on display together in the same building for the first time beginning May 8, 2010 and running through August 2010 at Mountain Light Gallery in Bishop, California. For more information Click Here and visit Current Exhibitions–Philip Hyde Photography.

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Photography And Art Dealers Rebound In 2010

April 10th, 2010 · Market News

Art And Photography Shows And Dealers Rebound With More Sales In 2010

On returning from the Association of International Photography Art Dealers (AIPAD) Show In New York City, Richard Gadd, director of the Weston Gallery in Carmel, California said that the market was starting to move again. “We sold a few Edward Westons and a Paul Strand. It seemed like sales were being made.”
His observations were correct. Sales were being made, quite a few. Alex Novak, who is a private dealer, member of the Getty Museum Photography Council, Daguerreian Society, American Historical Photography Society, AIPAD and a contributor to Photo Review, Photograph Collector and several newsletters on photography collecting assured his readers this has been the pattern lately. Alex Novak wrote on i-Photo Central in an article called, “Art and Photography Market Bounces Back as Shows and Dealers Report more Sales in 2010“:

The economic lead-in to the upcoming AIPAD Show in New York City is looking a lot more positive than it has been in the previous 18 months, as the art and photography market is poised to make some reasonable strides toward recovery. Reports from other shows earlier this year, including Photo LA and Art Basel Miami, and the recent Armory Show and ADAA Show—as well as from gallery and dealer comments to us—indicate that there has been a substantive uptick in sales and activity from most of last year, when declines in business in 2009 over 2008 were commonly 40-75%.… Of course there are exceptions: David Fahey told me that 2009 was actually much better than 2008—one of the few photo dealers to have this experience. Dealers at Photo LA and the smaller satellite show at Michael Dawson’s generally reported decent to excellent business. Several, including Sid Monroe of Monroe Gallery of Photography, Santa Fe, NM, and Louis Klaitman of Berkeley, CA, told me that this year’s Photo LA was one of their best shows ever.” …Art dealers and show managers at the Armory Show and ADAA Show report big, enthusiastic crowds and big buyers back out on the hunt in recent weeks. Our own business is projected to be up about 50% through next month over the year before, and we’ve heard similar stories from photography dealers that we’ve talked to recently. There is talk again about the so-called “safety” of putting your assets into art, especially with the currency ups and downs lately. While I’ve always discounted such loose advice, it does seem to reflect an overall mood that buying art and photography again is fun and poised for growth.

Certain other dealers are still reporting little to no sales at all. I was in a gallery recently, considered a pillar of the photography gallery establishment, and the owner said he was overdrawn at the bank. Most indicators point to the recovery moving slowly, but it is in progress.

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Philip Hyde Vintage Prints Now At Weston Gallery

March 7th, 2010 · Galleries For Philip Hyde

Philip Hyde Vintage Black And White Prints Now At The Weston Gallery

ANNOUNCMENT:
A selection of Yosemite National Park and Point Lobos State Reserve Philip Hyde contact 4X5 and 5X7 vintage black and white prints

NOW AVAILABLE AT:

THE WESTON GALLERY
6th Avenue and Delores Street
Carmel, CA   93921
831-624-4453

Ask for Richard Gadd, Gallery Director

Surf, Rocks, Point Lobos State Reserve, California, 1949, by Philip Hyde. Part of an Assignment from Minor White, lead instructor at Ansel Adam's Photography Department at the California School of Fine Arts now the San Francisco Art Institute.

(See the photograph full screen: Click Here.)

Philip Hyde’s artist information will be added to the Weston Gallery Website, a link will be provided and a more official announcement will be made…

For those not within driving distance of Carmel, a small number of vintage photography school era (1946-1950) contact 4X5 and 5X7 Philip Hyde original black and white prints, as well as a few 8X10 vintage original black and white prints, are currently being shown privately. The 4X5 and 5X7 contact prints are not signed by Philip Hyde, but carry his working print “Proof” stamp or “Exhibition Only” stamp. The 8X10 and larger vintage silver prints are signed.

A Photography School Era Vintage Black and White Print Exhibition in the San Francisco Bay Area is in the works for this year. Dates to be finalized later this Spring when the gallery finishes moving into a new space.

COMING SOON TO PHILIP HYDE.COM…A description of Philip Hyde’s modifications and updates to the silver gelatin printing process for black and white prints, with variations as originally taught by Ansel Adams, Edward Weston and Minor White at the California School of Fine Arts, now the San Francisco Art Institute.

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