Fine Art Photography Collector's Resource

A Resource for Collectors of Fine Art Photography, The Landscape Photography Of Philip Hyde And His Colleagues

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The Experts On Starting A Photography Collection 1

May 17th, 2010 · 11 Comments · Collecting How-To

Thunderstorm Over The Grand Canyon, alternately titled Thunderstorm Over Navajo Country from The Grand Canyon North Rim, Arizona, 1963 by Philip Hyde. Exhibited at the International Center of Photography, New York, "Master Photographs: Photography In The Fine Arts" Exhibition. Became a book called "Master Photographs: From 'Photography In The Fine Arts' Exhibitions, 1959-1967" with essays by Norman Cousins and others.

(See the photograph above full screen Click Here.)

Photography Has Proven One Of The Most Profitable And Satisfying Art Forms To Collect.

How Do The Experts Recommend Starting A Collection?

The maturing of photography as an art form has been accompanied by an explosion of interest both in the enjoyment and creation of photographs. With the advent of digital cameras and camera phones, nearly everyone is now making images. Interest in collecting photography has also grown dramatically, not to mention the value of some photographs.

In a November 2006 Fortune Magazine Article titled, “Investors Zoom In On Photography,” Stephen Milioti wrote that in the decade from 1996 to 2006, a photographic print by Helmut Newton “enjoyed better price appreciation than a comparable investment in an S&P 500 index fund, General Electric Stock, or ten-year treasury bonds. And Newton isn’t the only photographer whose prices are on the rise.” Prices and demand fell off in 2008 and 2009 but are rebounding well in 2010. See the blog post, “Photography And Art Dealers Rebound In 2010.” Photography collecting is generally much easier to get into than collecting any other art form. For example: collectible photographs are still much more reasonably priced than collectible paintings and within reach of most Americans. Caution is still advised though. Bizmove.com’s Small Business Knowledge Base, Guide to Good Fine Art Investment said, “Buying art solely as an investment is riskier, in many cases, than the stock market. Most art decreases in value. Over 95 percent of the first one-person shows in New York (or any major city) in any given season are from artists never heard from again.”

Lorraine Anne Davis, a columnist for Black and White Magazine, appraiser and respected consultant to museums and photography art dealers spent five years reviewing and updating the contents of a classic book on the subject called The Photograph Collector’s Guide by Lee D. Witkin and Barbara London. The Photograph Collector’s Guide first published in 1979 is still considered by many to be an essential reference book and will be republished in a new edition this Fall. Lee D. Witkin founded the Witkin Gallery in New York City in 1969 that worked to educate collectors and showed the historically important work of Alfred Stieglitz, Edward Steichen, Edward Weston, Edward S. Curtis, Manuel Alvarez Bravo, Brassai, Robert Doisneau and others.  Lee D. Witkin until his passing in 1984, also was an internationally known appraiser and advisor to major museums, private collectors and the LIFE photographic archive.

In The Photograph Collector’s Guide, Lee D. Witkin described how when he first opened Witkin Gallery experts in the art field that he asked for advice were all negative. He was told that “there was little hope of a gallery making it.” Lee D. Witkin wrote:

I was warned that six months, one year at most, was as long as I could expect to last—because no one collected photographs. The explosion of interest in photography during the 1970s is a truly remarkable phenomenon in light of the century and a quarter of neglect the medium and those practicing it suffered. In years past the idea of the photograph as a collectible art object was certainly suspect, if not inconceivable…. What I did have, however, along with the instincts of a professional, were the passions of a collector. Collecting (and every collector knows the symptoms) means seeking, desiring, wanting, yearning for, coveting, having to have…and–as soon as possible—acquiring, possessing, hugging to the bosom, and savoring with all the joys and pride of ownership. It is impossible to explain to someone who is not consumed by such passions why the purchase of a special painting, book or photograph takes priority over a trip to Europe, a new pair of shoes, or a gold inlay. We all know collecting art is not a pursuit basic for survival. However, it is an exquisite involvement with aesthetic achievements—a kind of mingling with the gods…. Photography is still relatively untapped. Many masterworks and gentler minor works have yet to be discovered and appreciated. A solid base for collecting and for future interest has been established not only by the serious activity of major museums and individuals, but also by educational programs. Many beginning collectors ask, “What should I collect?” My advice always has been and always will be: Collect what you like and trust your instincts. The good fortune of a young woman who years ago bought on instinct what is now a highly valued Imogen Cunningham print illustrates what I mean. She tells me whenever we meet, “I love my Cunningham—every day.”

Lee D. Witkin quoted one of his gallery’s first customers, Dan Berley, who became a prominent collector. He said:

I have always used two criteria in my collecting: first, the image must produce a strong emotional feeling in me; and, second, there must be a high quality to the photographic print itself. Because I never collect ‘names,’ per se, I buy the work of unknown or forgotten photographers as well as famous ones.

Lee D. Witkin emphasized the importance of “doing your homework,” to include learning about various photographic processes and their dates, understanding terminology, reading about the most up-to-date techniques for care and preservation, reading exhibition catalogs, and attending gallery and museum shows. “Examine photographs closely and discover that original prints have unique qualities of tone, luminosity, and “presence” that no book or magazine reproduction can duplicate. From the first day I opened the doors of my gallery, I have repeatedly heard the remark: ‘I’d only seen the image in books—I had no idea it was so beautiful!’”

The same goes today: browsing websites and looking at photographs on the internet is a good way to start and to narrow your searches, but there is no substitute for seeing a “live” exhibition and being able to meet the artist or a knowledgeable dealer. Bizmove.com’s Small Business Knowledge Base, Guide to Good Fine Art Investment also had these points to offer the new collector as guides:

  • Don’t buy a painting (or photograph) because it matches the sofa.
  • Don’t buy a work of art because your neighbors are collecting “names” like Picasso or Man Ray.
  • Don’t blindly follow the critics. Time is the only test of art. A critic’s tastes may veer in different directions at different periods. Just because experts endorse an artist now doesn’t mean they’ll favor him in 10 or 20 years.
  • Don’t be afraid to sail against the wind. Some of the biggest fortunes in art or antiques have been made by people who weren’t afraid to buck the trend. Tastes change.
  • Look for periods and artists that please your own eye, but are not popular at present. Reputations change with time.
  • Stick to reputable galleries that are members of dealer’s associations (such as AIPAD, The Association of International Photography Art Dealers.)
  • Learn to identify that elusive characteristic called quality.
  • Take courses on art (and photography).
  • Find the smartest people (artists, museum curators, top dealers and critics) in the field and pick their brains on a continuing basis.
  • Expect works of art and your collection to fare poorly for a few years then appreciate.

The number one reason collectors fail is lack of education. Many experts suggest reading, studying and frequenting galleries, museums and exhibitions for at least a year before buying anything. This is just the beginning of what there is to know. Many collectors spend many years and are still learning.

The blog post to come, “The Experts On Starting A Photography Collection 2” and others will examine pricing, rarity, types of editions, more collecting pointers, other methods for getting started and a list of resources and books for the collector.

See also the blog post, “Photography And Art Dealers Rebound In 2010.”

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11 Comments so far ↓

  • The Experts On Starting A Photography Collection 1 » Landscape Photography Blogger

    […] In a November 2006 Fortune Magazine Article titled, “Investors Zoom In On Photography,” Stephen Milioti wrote that in the decade from 1996 to 2006, a photographic print by Helmut Newton “enjoyed better price appreciation than a comparable investment in an S&P 500 index fund, General Electric Stock, or ten-year treasury bonds. And Newton isn’t the only photographer whose prices are on the rise.” Prices and demand fell off in 2008 and 2009 but are rebounding well in 2010. >>>> READ MORE >>>> […]

  • Joe

    I think Lee D. Witkin offers an interesting perspective in your article. “First, the image must produce a strong emotional feeling in me; and, second, there must be a high quality to the photographic print itself.” With the popularization of digital photography during the past 10 years it has become a lot easier to find strong emotional photography. However, the second part, quality, is becoming tougher to find.

  • admin

    Hi Joe, thank you for the quality insight. This is what I have been trying to put into words about the masses of work I’ve seen around today. As I read Lee D. Witkin’s book I feel like there are many statements of his that apply so well to the new digital era. I didn’t think of this one though and you have hit the nail on the head.

  • Tweets that mention The Experts On Starting A Photography Collection 1 -- Topsy.com

    […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Jim Goldstein, William Neill. William Neill said: Interesting blog about collecting photographs by Philip Hyde's son: http://bit.ly/cwfAVh […]

  • admin

    Jim Goldstein and Bill Neill thank you for mentioning this post on Twitter. I appreciate it.

  • Jim Goldstein

    Great write up. The perspective and tips provided by both Witkin and Bizmove.com are insightful for new collectors and a great reminder for experienced collectors. Thanks for sharing this it was a great read.

  • admin

    Thank you Jim for reading and for your kind words. I hope I can continue to post material on this blog that is worth your time to read. I take what you say as the utmost compliment coming from a successful photographer. Are you also a collector as well?

  • Large Format Photography

    I recently tweeted and stumbled upon your post. Really your post is very informative and I enjoyed your opinions. Do you use twitter or stumbleupon? So I can follow you there. I am hoping you post again soon.

  • admin

    Hi Large Format, I don’t use either yet, but will. Stay tuned. Also, I will have a subscription box here so you can follow Fine Art Photography Collector’s Resource by e-mail. Thanks for asking.

  • The History of Collecting Photography 1

    […] from Lee D. Witkin and The Photograph Collector’s Guide see the blog post, “The Experts On Starting A Photography Collection 1.” In addition, the blog post to come, “The Experts On Starting A Photography Collection […]

  • Savane

    Thanks you for your artcle. I’m a
    Photograph collector also a comptenporary
    Artists but I love photograph because
    They captured what they see.

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