Fine Art Photography Collector's Resource

A Resource for Collectors of Fine Art Photography, The Landscape Photography Of Philip Hyde And His Colleagues

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This Land Is Our Land: Philip Hyde And The American Wilderness At Smith Andersen North Gallery

January 24th, 2014 · Special Announcements

This Land Is Our Land: Philip Hyde And The American Wilderness

Smith Andersen North Gallery
San Anselmo, Marin County, California

January 25 – March 1, 2014

Opening Reception: January 25, 6 – 9 pm

Grand Canyon From Point Imperial, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona, copyright 1964 Philip Hyde.

Grand Canyon From Point Imperial, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona, copyright 1964 Philip Hyde.

Philip Hyde defended the Western American wilderness with a camera for nearly 60 years, working with the National Audubon Society, Wilderness Society, Sierra Club, and other environmental organizations. He studied at the California School of Fine Arts, now the San Francisco Art Institute, in Ansel Adams’ ground breaking photography program with Minor White as lead instructor and Edward Weston as field mentor. Imogen Cunningham, Dorothea Lange, Lisette Model and other notable West Coast photographers were guest lecturers. This training gave Philip Hyde a solid creative foundation for evolving into one of America’s most respected landscape photographers.

Philip Hyde’s photographs helped protect the Grand Canyon, Point Reyes National Seashore, Redwood National Park, North Cascades National Park, Canyonlands, Big Sur, the Wind River Range, Sequoia National Park and many other national treasures included in  more wilderness campaigns than protected by any other photographer of his time. It all began when David Brower and Richard Leonard of the Sierra Club sent Philip Hyde on the first assignment ever for an environmental cause to Dinosaur National Monument where the canyons of the Yampa and Green Rivers were threatened by two proposed dams.

David Brower called Philip Hyde his “go-to photographer,” because when the Sierra Club needed to look closer or show the public an area’s natural beauty, Philip Hyde, young, eager and hungry, dropped everything and traveled across the West capturing sensitive lands on film, thereby becoming one of the primary illustrators of the Sierra Club Exhibit Format Series. The Sierra Club Books Series, originally conceived by Ansel Adams, Nancy Newhall and David Brower, became the public face of the fledgling modern environmental movement during the 1950s and 1960s.

Color photography became an important feature of the Sierra Club Books when color reproduction quality improved enough that David Brower and the Sierra Club publications committee encouraged Philip Hyde and Eliot Porter to envision their book projects in color to more powerfully amplify environmental campaigns. Philip Hyde and Eliot Porter were responsible for establishing color landscape photography as an art in its own right.  Philip Hyde’s compositions inspired a generation of photographers, both directly and indirectly, and his techniques are still emulated in current landscape photography today.

Philip Hyde’s images have appeared in more than 80 books and over 100 other publications, including Aperture, the New York Times, Life, National Geographic, Fortune, and Newsweek. Not only did Philip Hyde receive many awards and honors throughout his career, his photographs were shown in major museums and galleries nationwide, including the Smithsonian Institution and the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

David Leland Hyde, Philip Hyde’s son, will speak at the Smith Andersen North opening reception on January 25. David Leland Hyde is an accomplished photographer in his own right, a photo historian and ambassador of his father’s photography to the world’s best galleries, museums and collectors.

For more details see the blog post, “Major Northern California Philip Hyde Exhibition.”

This Land Is Our Land: Philip Hyde And The Wilderness West

January 25 – March 1, 2014

Opening Reception January 25, 6 – 9 pm

Presentation At 7 pm

Smith Andersen North Gallery
20 Greenfield Avenue
San Anselmo CA 94960
415 455 9733

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New Release: Rainbow Bridge From The Upstream Side (Color)

June 20th, 2013 · Special Announcements

New Release: Rainbow Bridge From The Upstream Side (Color)

“Rainbow Bridge From The Upstream Side, Now Rainbow Bridge National Monument, Utah, (Color) 1965” from the Sierra Club Exhibit Format Series book, “Navajo Wildlands: As Long As The Rivers Shall Run” by Stephen C. Jett and Philip Hyde.

Rainbow Bridge From The Upstream Side, Now Rainbow Bridge National Monument, Utah, (Color) 1965 by Philip Hyde.

The Special Edition Archival Fine Art Digital Prints made by David Leland Hyde and Carr Clifton, a 30-year friend and protege of Philip Hyde, are rare and limited in a unique way. They are limited through pricing. The regular prices only apply to the first 10 prints of each photograph. Each time 10 prints sell of each image, that particular photograph goes up $100 in all sizes. For more specifics on pricing and further information about the unique archival fine art digital prints see the blog post, “About Archival Fine Art Digital Prints.”

Philip Hyde Photography is proud to present an archival fine art digital print of “Rainbow Bridge From The Upstream Side, Now Rainbow Bridge National Monument, Utah, (Color) 1965.” To read more about the making of this vintage photograph go to the blog post, “The Making Of Rainbow Bridge From The Upstream Side.” This photograph was never printed by Philip Hyde himself. Therefore, this release of archival digital prints enables collectors to have this historically important photograph for the first time. When first released in August 2010, this photograph came out as a limited edition. Now that all Philip Hyde authorized archival digital prints are made in limited editions in the two largest sizes, 24X30 and 32X40, this photograph is also available as a limited edition in the 24X30 size only and as a numbered special edition in all other sizes. This photograph is not available as a 32X40 print.

First published on August 9, 2010, which would have been Ardis Hyde’s 85th birthday.

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Photography Galleries, Collectors, Appraisers And Digital Prints

March 12th, 2013 · Collecting How-To

Background On Lorraine Anne Davis Of Black And White Magazine And Her Article On Digital Prints

Lorraine Anne Davis MA, MFA, a fine art photography appraiser doing business as Archive & Collection Management, LLC, with offices in Los Angeles, Santa Fe, Houston and New York has been appraising photographs and photography collections since 1984. She writes feature articles and two regular columns on appraising photographs for Black and White Magazine: For Collectors of Fine Art Photography and has contributed to many academic publications. She studied under Amy Conger, PhD and Peter Bunnell at Princeton. She printed for the Chicago Albumen Works and worked as Bernice Abbott’s printer and archivist. She also was the assistant director of the Paul Strand Archive, a curator for Galerie zur Stockeregg in Zurich, Switzerland and the Pfeifer Collection also in Zurich. She is a fully Accredited Specialist of Photography in the Appraisers Association of America and carries a Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice (USPAP) certificate as set by the Appraisal Foundation in Washington, D.C. She has signed and adheres to the AAA’s Code of Ethics. She is available for lectures and workshops on appraising, preservation of photographs and collection management for collectors and institutions.

In the April 2009, Issue 66 of Black and White Magazine, Lorraine Anne Davis wrote an article for her column titled, “Concerning Digital Reprints.” In the article, Davis wrote that there is no longer any argument against the legitimacy of digital prints in general, but there is still a question regarding digital “’reprints’ by photographer’s estates or of public domain images whose negatives were created to be rendered in traditional analog processes.” She mentioned that Imogen Cunningham’s Estate, the Ansel Adams Gallery and Edward S. Curtis’ public domain image printers were producing digital prints. She made the argument that these digital prints were not only of little value themselves, but that they were undermining the value of the “original” hand-made prints by the artists themselves.

The Effect Of Digital Prints On Value Of “Original” Prints By Ansel Adams, Imogen Cunningham And Edward S. Curtis

While I have much respect for Davis and for those who admire her, which are numerous in the industry, not to mention that she has been helpful to me; in this case, based on considerable evidence, I disagree with part of what she wrote and agree with part of it too. In the case of the Ansel Adams Trust, the production and sales of their “digital replicas” that are high quality digital photographs of Ansel Adams’ prints, have had zero negative impact on the value of Ansel Adams’ hand-made darkroom silver gelatin prints. In fact, the digital prints and their promotion has brought more attention to Ansel Adams’ work and allowed for a wider economic diversity of buyers and gallery patrons. Since it is difficult to find some Ansel Adams prints, the digital prints also make more of the images readily available.

Scott Nichols of the Scott Nichols Gallery in San Francisco, who also happens to have the largest private collection of Brett Weston prints in the world, said that Imogen Cunningham’s heirs “flooded the market with cheap digital prints” and this devalued her collectible “original” prints. Certainly I have heard from a number of sources that Imogen Cunningham’s heirs have made a number of mistakes in representing her, but I imagine they are sincere in trying to do right by her work, which can be proven by the reality that they corrected course and changed the way they are offering the digital prints. Imogen Cunningham digital prints are no longer available through Pottery Barn and other online discount art retailers. Meanwhile, black and white prints by Imogen Cunningham herself have retained and gone up in value during the recent downturn. They are still very strong in the market and may have been strengthened by all the publicity over the modern digital prints. As they say in journalism school, “All publicity, even bad publicity is good publicity.”

As for Edward S. Curtis’ digital prints, Davis herself said:

…In the case of Edward Curtis’ “original” digital prints, made from scans of original photogravures, there are so many vintage, original photogravures available of his work that to purchase a digital facsimile is similar to purchasing a facsimile of the American Constitution when one visits Philadelphia as a tourist. The facsimiles produced for wall decoration might be pleasant enough, but anyone who collects photographs, even on a small scale, can for the same amount of money buy an original work of art.

In other words, Edward S. Curtis’ vintage photogravures are already so common and worth so little that digital prints were equal to them in value when they were first issued. In this case, obviously the digital prints do not devalue the “original” prints. If anything, the issue of the digital prints may spark more sales of the photogravures.

How Are Digital Prints Valued? Are They Collectible?

Davis goes on to delineate one aspect of print value:

The value of a photographic print is affected by the type of print it is, whether it is an “original” executed directly by the artist, or under the artist’s supervision, or it is one, two or more generations removed from the original.

One evening at an opening at Smith Andersen North Gallery, Stefan Kirkeby introduced me to a collector interested in vintage black and white prints from photographers like my father who were students of Ansel Adams and Minor White in the first 10 years, now called the Golden Decade, of the revolutionary professional creative photography program at the California School of Fine Arts, now the San Francisco Art Institute. This collector said that he did have digital prints in his collection, but that he did not want digital prints of that era. I don’t blame him for not wanting digital prints from that era when he could afford vintage darkroom silver prints. However, what he did not realize is that unlike many of the other Golden Decade photographers, my father, pioneer landscape photographer Philip Hyde’s renown was not limited only to the time period when he was making black and white prints as an apprentice to Ansel Adams and Minor White. Ansel Adams had more students than any other photographer in history. Yet Dad is known for being one of only three of Ansel Adams’ thousands of students who Ansel Adams invited to teach side-by-side with him in his Ansel Adams Workshops in Yosemite Valley. Dad is also known for participating in more environmental campaigns than any other photographer, making many national parks and more wilderness than any other photographer, being the primary contributor to the Sierra Club Exhibit Format Series that popularized the coffee table photography book, and perhaps most pertinent to this discussion, Dad is known, along with Eliot Porter for having introduced color to landscape photography.

Most of the archival lightjet and digital prints we make are of the most prominent color images that are nearly out of stock or sold out now because Dad made so few dye transfer and Cibachrome prints of them to begin with. He made in nearly all cases only 2-8 prints of each image. The other archival lightjet and digital prints we make are of Dad’s damaged or age-faded original color film transparencies. A relatively few of our digital prints are made from the black and white negatives, in fact nearly all of the black and white digital prints are made from scans not of the negatives, but of Dad’s prints. I would not suggest to the collector to acquire archival lightjet or digital prints instead of vintage prints, but rather to consider them whenever the “original” color prints are no longer available. For the lovers of darkroom silver gelatin prints, we plan to come out with modern black and white prints of some of Dad’s photographs too, those of which we have no more prints available.

Provenance Of Philip Hyde Archival Lightjet And Digital Prints

Our color archival lightjet and digital prints are made by master landscape photographer Carr Clifton, who has been a photographer now for more than 35 years and a digital printer for over 15 years. His mother introduced him to my father when he was a young teenager before he even had a camera. He had made a number of home movies but told his mother that he thought he would rather be a still nature photographer. He received advice on a starter camera, photography school and other aspects of getting started from Dad and this began a life-long mentor relationship and friendship.

The Sierra Club’s printer, Barnes Press, in 1966 had damaged two of Dad’s original color film transparencies from the Exhibit Format Series Book, Navajo Wildlands. Someone at Barnes Press had mishandled the transparencies with their bare hands and put fingerprints in the sky of the photographs, “Horse at the Mouth of Canyon de Chelly” and “Stormlight, Canyon de Chelly,” two of Dad’s most important images. Starting in 1998, using Photoshop, Carr Clifton restored the sky and removed the fingerprints. He then made large, detailed, sharp as any ever, digital prints of the two photographs. My father was blown away. Marveling at the new technology, he authorized Carr Clifton to print digital prints eight years before his death in 2006 and two years before he lost his eyesight in 2000. Dad even signed at least five, maybe a few more of the digital prints. Since they were authorized and overseen by Dad, just as Lorraine Anne Davis mentioned in her article, our archival lightjet and digital prints cannot be considered posthumous prints, but have collector value as photographer authorized prints. Having Carr Clifton and myself printing my father’s photographs is comparable to the printing of Edward Weston’s prints by Brett Weston and Cole Weston.

For more on our process, intent and the provenance of our archival lightjet and digital prints, see the blog post on Landscape Photography Blogger called, “Why Photography Galleries, Curators And Collectors Like Limited Editions.”

Why and How Intent Impacts Print Value

In her article Davis quotes Richard Benson’s writing about his 2009 exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in New York called The Printed Picture:

When a picture is skillfully made drawing or painting, its meaning surely derives to a huge degree from the intention of its maker. But when a picture is a reproduction of a drawing or a painting, the case is very different, because the form and therefore the meaning of this second generation picture are then heavily influenced by the technology used to produce the reproduction… When the picture-making system is photography, though, everything becomes muddled, because even in original work—photographs taken out in the world—the mind of the maker has to share the driver’s seat with the form of the picture as it is shaped by the technology of photography. And when a photograph is reproduced, things get more difficult, because such reproductions can only be made by re-photographing the photograph. It then becomes very hard to tell whether the person doing the reproduction or the technology itself might be in charge.

While this may be somewhat Orwellian in perspective, it certainly describes much of what is happening with not only digital photography today, but with Photoshop and other post-processing computer technology. Meanwhile, Davis goes on to clarify her position:

As an appraiser, I feel it is safe to say that high-end, artist-made or controlled reproductions will maintain their relative value as compared to the originals. However, one should be aware that when purchasing reproductions of a photograph, no matter what technology was used, that the intent will influence the value.

To this end, we have worked extremely hard and spent tens of thousands of dollars to be sure to apply my father’s aesthetics to our printing process and to match how he printed his dye transfer and Cibachrome prints as closely as we can when we are “developing” or “post-processing” in Photoshop the archival high resolution drum scans of Dad’s original color film transparencies to be made into either archival lightjet prints or archival digital prints. For more on our intent, our process and what steps we have taken to cause Philip Hyde archival prints to go up in value and increase attractiveness over time for collectors see the blog post also mentioned above, “Why Photography Galleries, Curators And Collectors Like Limited Editions.”

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The History of Collecting Photography 1

November 29th, 2012 · History of Photography

Of All Art Forms, Photography Has Proven One Of The Most Profitable And Satisfying To Collect…

The art of collecting photography has followed the medium in an upward climb in popularity throughout its existence. But how did photography collecting begin? Who were the first collectors? What were the first photographs collected?

In The History of Photography, Beaumont Newhall presented various refinements of the history of daguerreotypes and some of the trends in their collecting demand. As far back as 1842, a Paris daguerreotypist’s studio was so popular that people often waited their turn for an hour or more to have their daguerreotype made. Furthermore, Newhall wrote:

Of all the countries, America adopted the daguerreotype with the most enthusiasm, and excelled in its practice. After the first attempts by Morse and Draper to take portraits, the Frenchman Francois Gouraud brought to America daguerreotypes taken by Daguerre and by himself which he exhibited in New York, Boston, and Prividence, RI, during the winter of 1839-1840. He gave demonstrations to packed audiences and sold apparatus; from him Americans learned Daguerre’s technique. Within a few years there were “Daguerreian Galleries” in leading American cities, and traveling daguerreotypists visited outlying communities.

Newhall described a number of improvements Americans made  to the process and how having a portrait made and collecting portraits became popular:

By 1853 there were 86 portrait galleries in New York City. Each American city and most of the larger towns boasted of several daguerrean galleries apiece, many of which were magnificently fitted out. Daguerreotypists vied with one another for the priviledge of making portraits of the famous. One of the largest collections wqas formed by Matthew B. Brady, a leather-case maker who opened a daguerreotype gallery in New York in 1944, and began to collect a Gallery of Illustrious Americans. It must not be assumed that all of the portraits in the collection were actually made by Brady. For years he had three galleries – two in New York and one in Washington – and employed many “operators,” as cameramen were called. He also constantly acquired, by purchase or exchange, portraits made in other galleries.

The popularity of the daguerreotype would not last long. Processes more adaptable to duplication with less danger of damage replaced fragile daguerreotypes. The rival paper process soon was perfected enough to allow the public to buy one print for the price of a dozen daguerreotypes.

Photography appraiser Penelope Dixon wrote in her essay, A Short History of Photograph Collecting that “collecting of photographs was practically simultaneous with the invention of photography.” For example, she said, “P. and D. Colnaghi, a well-established art gallery in London, sold photographs as early as the 1850s.” People exchanged and collected images of themselves, their friends and particularly their favorite celebrities. Travel photography was also an early collectible according to Dixon:

The very wealthy would set off on long excursions, “the grand tour”, and instead of taking their own photographs [the cumbersome and complicated equipment precluded this] they would purchase photographs of each place they visited, later putting them into large albums. An English gentleman’s album of the 1860s might include photographs by William Notman of Canada, Charles Clifford of Spain, Carlo Ponti and Fratelli Alinari of Italy and Felix Bonfils or A. Beato the Middle East. Many photographs were published in albums in the 19th century, presumably to be sold to institutions or wealthy private collectors. Photographic auctions also had their beginnings in the mid 19th century. The first auction of photographs took place in London in 1854. The first auction in America was a century later, The Marshall Sale, held by Swann Galleries in 1952.

Even though the US was a century behind on hosting auctions and connoisseurs on both continents still debated “photography as art,” by the early 20th century photographs had become firmly established as a collectible. American galleries were not as far behind as the auction houses. Alfred Stieglitz displayed photography in his various galleries next to the work of modern artists in New York from 1905 until his death in 1946. Others besides Stieglitz such as Julian Levy, ran a gallery in New York from 1931 to 1949 and introduced many photographers and others to collecting. From a few galleries in New York, London, Paris and other cities, we now find hundreds of galleries worldwide with large collector followings.

Museums began to establish ever larger collections, soon growing much bigger than the collections of private collectors. The world’s first photography museum, George Eastman House in Rochester, New York opened to the public in 1949 as an independent non-profit museum. It originally combined the landmark Colonial Revival mansion and gardens that George Eastman, the founder of Eastman Kodak Company, called home from 1905 to 1932. Now the museum is a National Historic Landmark and George Eastman is considered the father of modern photography and motion picture film. Having had the additions of entire archives, corporate collections and artist’s lifetime portfolios, the collection is now the largest in the world at over 400,000 photographs and negatives, as well as an extensive variety of rare motion pictures and ephemera. George Eastman House holds the largest collection of daguerreotypes or French plates outside France. The collection also includes original prints by William Henry Fox, inventor of the calotype process, other largest collections of rare calotype portrait pioneers such as D. O. Hill and Robert Adamson and other portrait studies by Julia Margaret Cameron, the French Masters including Gustave Le Gray and Henri Le Sacq, an extensive European topgraphical collection, and major photographic documents from the American Civil War, Alexander Garddner’s Photographic Sketchbook of the War and George N. Barnard’s Photographic Views of Sherman’s Campaign, as well as examples of Western expeditionary and landscape photographs by William Henry Jackson, Tomothy O’Sullivan, Carleton Watkins, Eadweard Muybridge and many others including modernist masters such as Ansel Adams and Philip Hyde.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City houses a photography department of over 25,000 treasures spanning the history of the medium from the 1830s to the present. The Metropolitan Museum of Art began collecting photographs in 1928, when Alfred Stieglitz, made the first of several significant gifts. In addition to his own photography, Stieglitz’ donations comprised the best collection of artists of the Photo Secession, the circle of Pictorialists originally shown at his gallery, including a rich set of master prints by Edward Steichen and other highlights including the work of F. Holland Day, Adolph de Meyer, Gertrude Kasebier, Paul Strand and Clarence White. The Met’s holdings include several other important collections including the Ford Motor collection with works by Berenice Abbott, Brassai, Walker Evans, Andre Kertesz, Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, and Man Ray. The Rubel Collection acquired in 1997 features superb examples of British photography from the first three decades of the mediums history. The Gilman Paper Company Collection acquired in 2005 was the world’s finest collection of photographs in private hands. It consists of over 8,500 holdings in early French, British and American photography as well as masterpieces from the turn-of-the-century and modernist periods. Many other major names and collections have come to reside under the Met’s roof such as the personal archive of Walker Evans, acquired in 1994, and the personal mid-century collection of photographer Diane Arbus, promised in 2007.

Museums and galleries both exhibited photography along side paintings and other art forms, but few exhibited photography only in the early days. It was not until 1963 that Hal Gould co-founded the non-profit Colorado Photographic Art Center in Denver, Colorado. The Colorado Photographic Art Center was one of the first galleries to exhibit photography exclusively. Hal Gould wrote that he began exhibiting the photography of the masters of the medium such as Imogen Cunningham, August Sanders, Philippe Halsman, Yosuf Karsh and others. As the market for photographic prints grew and the Colorado Photographic Art Center board voted not to sell prints, Hal Gould started the Camera Obscura Gallery, which has remained in business for over 50 years selling the work of prominent photographers to collectors. Philip Hyde participated in one of Hal Gould’s early exhibitions and was honored by Hal Gould as one of his last solo shows at Camera Obscura in 2010 just before the gallery closed with Hal Gould at age 90. Read more about Camera Obscura in the blog post, “Hal Gould And Camera Obscura: 50 Years Of Photography Advocacy.”

In The Photograph Collector’s Guide, Lee D. Witkin described how when he first opened Witkin Gallery in New York City in 1969 experts in the art field warned him, “There was little hope of a gallery making it… Six months, one year at most, was as long as I could expect to last—because no one collected photographs.” Lee D. Witkin wrote:

What I did have, however, along with the instincts of a professional, were the passions of a collector. Collecting (and every collector knows the symptoms) means seeking, desiring, wanting, yearning for, coveting, having to have…and–as soon as possible—acquiring, possessing, hugging to the bosom, and savoring with all the joys and prides of ownership. It is impossible to explain to someone who is not consumed by such passions why the purchase of a special painting, book or photograph takes priority over a trip to Europe, a new pair of shoes, or a gold inlay. We all know collecting art is not a pursuit basic for survival. However, it is an exquisite involvement with aesthetic achievements—a kind of mingling with the gods…. Photography is still relatively untapped. Many masterworks and gentler minor works have yet to be discovered and appreciated. A solid base for collecting and for future interest has been established not only by the serious activity of major museums and individuals, but also by educational programs. Many beginning collectors ask, “What should I collect?” My advice always has been and always will be: Collect what you like and trust your instincts. The good fortune of a young woman who years ago bought on instinct what is now a highly valued Imogen Cunningham print illustrates what I mean. She tells me whenever we meet, “I love my Cunningham—every day.

For more in-depth advice on collecting from Lee D. Witkin and The Photograph Collector’s Guide see the blog post, “The Experts On Starting A Photography Collection 1.” In addition, the blog post to come, “The Experts On Starting A Photography Collection 2” and others will examine pricing, rarity, types of editions, more collecting pointers, other methods for getting started and a list of resources and books for the collector. See also the blog post, “Photography And Art Dealers Rebound In 2010.”

 

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Golden Decade Photographers: The Legacy of Ansel Adams & Minor White

October 26th, 2012 · Exhibitions and Other Events, Galleries For Philip Hyde

Figurehead Gallery Presents:

The Legacy Of Ansel Adams And Minor White

Reception:  Sunday, November 4, 2012, 1-4 pm

Exhibit:  November 1-December 1, 2012

EXTENDED THROUGH DECEMBER 22, 2012

Buckskin Gulch, Paria River Canyon, Vermillion Cliffs Wilderness, Utah, copyright 1969 Philip Hyde. Baby Deardorff 4X5 large format view camera. Buckskin Gulch is the featured image on the announcement for The Legacy of Ansel Adams and Minor White show.

The Figurehead Gallery in Downtown Livermore is pleased to present an exhibit of photographs of the first students of the Photography Department at the California School of Fine Arts, now the San Francisco Art Institute. Founded by Ansel Adams, directed by Minor White, and staffed by such luminaries as Ansel Adams, Imogen Cunningham, Dorothea Lange, Lisette Model, and Edward Weston, the first photography department in the US to teach creative photography as a full-time profession began in 1945 at the California School of Fine Art, now the San Francisco Art Institute. The importance of the school and its influence, not only on West Coast Photography but on photography as a whole, has been far-reaching, lasting well into the 21st century. For more information see the blog post, “Figurehead Gallery Group Show: The Legacy of Ansel Adams & Minor White.”

The Figurehead Gallery
Old Theater Mall
2222 2nd Street, Suites 20 & 21
Livermore, CA 94550
925•337•1799
www.figureheadgallery.com
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Lumiere Gallery Presents: Designed By Nature

July 10th, 2012 · Exhibitions and Other Events

Designed By Nature Exhibition

Lumiere Gallery
The Galleries of Peachtree Hills
425 Peachtree Hills Ave Building 5 Suite 29B
Atlanta, GA 30305
404-261-6100

Group Exhibition: June 15, 2012 – August 18, 2012

Photographs by Wynn Bullock, Philip Hyde, Robert Glenn Ketchum, Bob Kolbrenner, Al Weber, Peter Essick, Tom Murphy and Robert Weingarten, and sculpture by David Hayes.

Dogwood, Sequoia Redwood Trees, Sequoia National Park, Sierra Nevada, California, copyright 1974 by Philip Hyde. An archival digital print of this photograph will hang with three other Philip Hyde prints in the group show.

“Everything that moves is a flow system. One that generate shape and structure in order to facilitate movement across a landscape filled with resistance. Flow systems have two basic properties… current that is flowing and the design through which it flows.” –From the book Design In Nature by Adrian Bejan and J. Peder Zane Rivers, lightning, trees and the human body all have a like architecture… >>read more>>

Lumiere Gallery Hours:
Tuesday – Thursday by appointment
Friday – Saturday 10 am – 4 pm Eastern

View information about the current exhibition showing at Plumas Arts’ Capitol Arts Center in the blog post, “Plumas Arts Reinvents The Capitol Club In Quincy, California.”

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Minor White–Philip Hyde Letters

May 4th, 2012 · History of Photography

Correspondence Between Philip Hyde And His Mentor And Teacher Minor White

Philip Hyde first studied under Ansel Adams in the 1946 Summer Session at the California School of Fine Arts, now the San Francisco Art Institute. That Summer Session was also the first time Minor White attended a class taught by Ansel Adams. Minor White sat in on a few classes of the Summer Session and began to interact with Ansel Adams’ students. Ansel Adams observing how Minor White coached and worked with some of the students quickly phased Minor White into teaching. Minor White had already come highly recommended to Ansel Adams by Nancy and Beaumont Newhall, who knew Minor White from Columbia University and Minor White’s involvement with the influential circle of photographers in New York City that centered around Alfred Stieglitz. By the end of the Summer Session Ansel Adams had decided to turn the lead teaching role in the new Photography Department over to Minor White because Ansel Adams had just received a Guggenheim Fellowship to photograph the national parks.

At first the students attending the full-time program in the Fall of 1946 protested that they had chosen the school to study with Ansel Adams, as the California School of Fine Arts had advertised. However, as they began to hear what Minor White had to say and learn what he had to teach, they began to come around to appreciating Minor White in his own right. They also benefited from the added interest of having Ansel Adams drop in on class from time to time and debate with Minor White on their differing approaches to photography.

After attending the 1946 Summer Session, due to a mix-up with Philip Hyde’s application paperwork, he could not start in the first full-time class in the Fall of 1946. Minor White suggested to Philip Hyde that he use his G. I. Bill funding and attend classes at UC Berkeley during the year he would be waiting to start in the second full-time class at CSFA in the Fall of 1947. At UC Berkeley, Philip Hyde ran across a young lady he had met at a New Year’s party right after his December 1945 honorable discharge from the Army Air Corp of World War II. The young lady named Ardis King and Philip Hyde took a few classes together at UC Berkeley including a calligraphy and painting class from the famous Japanese painter Chiura Obata. Ardis King and Philip Hyde married in June 1947 and Philip Hyde started photography school that Fall. (Read more about the courses and their content in the series of blog posts starting with th blog post, “Photography’s Golden Era 6.” See also the blog post, “The Golden Decade: Photography At The California School Of Fine Arts.”)

Philip Hyde finished the three-year photography program in the Spring of 1950. After his graduation, he stayed in contact through correspondence and visits with Minor White, Ansel Adams and Edward Weston, Philip Hyde’s three primary mentors. Much later, beginning in 1970, Philip Hyde became one of only three California School of Fine Arts photography students who Ansel Adams invited to teach side-by-side with him in his prestigious and renowned photography workshops in Yosemite National Park and Carmel. The other two students from CSFA that taught with Ansel Adams were John Upton and Pirkle Jones. The files of correspondence after 1950 between Ansel Adams and Philip Hyde fill three large folders nearly two inches thick each. The letters between Edward Weston and Philip Hyde numbered less than a dozen because of Edward Weston’s failing health. Minor White and Philip Hyde had a more extensive correspondence, numbering somewhere between 20 and 30 letters each. To read the actual letters between Minor White and Philip Hyde please refer to the series of blog posts beginning with, “Minor White Letters 1.” Enjoy.

References:

The Moment of Seeing: Minor White at the California School of Fine Arts by Stephanie Comer, Deborah Klochko and Jeff Gunderson

Ansel Adams: An Autobiography by Ansel Adams

Ansel Adams: A Biography by Mary Street Alinder

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New Philip Hyde Video

November 17th, 2011 · Special Announcements

Philip Hyde from Lumière on Vimeo.

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Guy Tal Interviews David Leland Hyde

October 30th, 2011 · Special Announcements

Guy Tal Interviews David Leland Hyde On Representing Philip Hyde, Sierra Club Books, Leland Hyde And Art School In Paris, Photography School With Ansel Adams, Edward Weston, Minor White, The Alternate Path To Fame, Conservation And Photography, Writing About Photography, The Roots Of Creativity, Learning From Dad Or Not?, How Philip Hyde’s Compositions Influenced A Generation Of Photographers, And Much More

Adobe Wall Detail, Taos, New Mexico, copyright 2009 by David Leland Hyde.

(See the photograph large: go to “Adobe Wall Detail, Taos, New Mexico.”)

One of the top photography bloggers writing today recently interviewed David Leland Hyde on his blog: Guy Tal Photography Journal. For a comprehensive journey into the lives of three generations of the Hyde family, the roots of their creativity and their unique impact on the Art of the West, see Guy Tal’s blog post, “Interview With David Leland Hyde.”

This interview provides insight into the concerns of landscape photographers working today, while tying today’s work to the past and the beginnings of the modern environmental movement and photography of the natural scene. The reader discovers a new understanding of how the masters and pioneers of the past paved the way for the accomplishments in landscape photography today.

“Thank you both for this rare and intimate look into one of the greats of American landscape photography.”  –Russ Bishop

“Best interview I’ve read in quite some time. Thank you, both, very much.”  –Scott Bacon

“David:  Excellent ‘interview.’  You really have digested a lot of stuff in the past few years, and you present it well.  You have captured your folks in a good manner and for a few moments they were very present for me.  Nice feeling. Keep the book coming.” –Chris Brown

“Very deep and thorough interview. This is great.”  –Richard Wong

“Thanks for a great interview, Guy–and thanks to David for his candor and willingness to share his thoughts and family history with all of us.”  –Robin Black

“Thanks for a fascinating journey. When my sons and I lived in Indian Valley, we socialized on occasion with the Hydes. I answered affirmatively if anyone asked did I know the Hydes … Reading this has given after-the-fact substance to that affirmation. I’ve done a lot of catching up in this interview.”  –Ron Schmidt

“I still have my copy of Slickrock, purchased back in 1971. The Hyde exhibit at the Camera Obscura gallery in Denver last year was superb. At that time, I was amazed to find that so few photographers recognized Philip’s name. I’m glad to see David’s continuing effort in placing his father’s contributions in context. Excellent interview, Guy.”  –Bill Pelzmann

“Interesting and ironic to read this fine interview just as I’ve returned from speaking at the California University of Pennsylvania, where our photo exhibit “Lasting Light: 125 Years of Grand Canyon Photography” is on tour from the Smithsonian. Both the exhibit and my book of the same name feature Philip Hyde–and so on Tuesday I was telling hundreds of middle-schoolers from northern Appalachia about Philip Hyde’s commitment to help save the Grand Canyon with pictures. See http://www.stephentrimble.net/projects/lasting-light/ for more info.”  –Stephen Trimble

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Lumiere Gallery Fall Exhibitions: Photography As Propaganda

September 29th, 2011 · Exhibitions and Other Events

Lumiere Gallery Presents:

Photography As Propaganda

“Photography abstracts real time and space…compressing what really happened into a metaphor with its own message.”

Two Exhibitions – Fall 2011

Politics and the Utopian Dream

September 24 – November 12, 2011

Messages From The Wilderness

November 12 – December 23, 2011

For more information about the exhibitions see Lumiere Gallery What’s New.

Great Overhang, Moqui Canyon, Glen Canyon, Utah, copyright 1964 Philip Hyde. After the gates of Glen Canyon Dam had closed and "Lake" Powell was filling. Prominent In Lumiere Gallery's Fall exhibition, "Messages From The Wilderness."

Politics and the Utopian Dream

September 24 – November 12, 2011

Photography’s ability to abstract time and space provides a potent vehicle with which to communicate a point of view. Whether migrating a nation to a utopian social and economic order or framing public policy debates, the power of the photographic image was used effectively in the 20th Century by both totalitarian and democratic leaders. This exhibition illustrates its power to inform and influence. It reminds us of the future impact potential of imagery to amplify ideas using an array of new electronic technologies.
Including photography by: Boris Ignatovich, Dorothea Lange, Yevgeny Khaldei, Arnold Newman, Ivan Shagin, John Gutmann, Alexandr Ustinov, Rondal Partridge, Max Alpert & Georgi Zelma.

Opening Reception: Saturday September 24, 2011
5:30 pm – 8:30 pm
Lumiere Gallery
425 Peachtree Hills Avenue, Building 5, Suite 29B
Atlanta, GA   30305   404-261-6100

Powerful Meanings In Photography

Lecture: Wednesday September 21, 2011  7:00 pm
Dr. Anthony Bannon, Director, George Eastman House
Hill Auditorium, High Museum of Art
Atlanta, GA

Messages From The Wilderness

November 12 – December 23, 2011

This exhibition features works deploying the visual power of photography to communicate an understanding and appreciation of the great American wilderness. These photographers have captured the beauty and form of nature…using pictorialism, abstraction and unusual lighting effect to communicate a story or to stimulate the viewer’s innate imagination. Their work has often provided the foundation for major conservation movements.
Including photography by: Philip Hyde, Robert Glenn Ketchum, Ansel Adams, Edward Weston, Brett Weston, Bradford Washington & Al Weber.

Compliments the Atlanta History Center’s exhibition:
Nature’s Beloved Son: Rediscovering John Muir’s Botanical Legacy
October 13 – December 4, 2011

Gallery Talks: Schedule to be announced – check www.lumieregallery.net for the latest information.

See Philip Hyde’s Lumiere Gallery Artist Page.

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